info@handsupport.org, 650-367-6993
StarVista 24/7 Support Hotline:
(650) 579–0350
 
In light of COVID-19 spreading among our communities, ALL IN-PERSON HAND SUPPORT GROUP MEETINGS ARE CANCELLED until further notice. During this time, HAND remains dedicated to supporting families who've experienced a loss in any way possible. You still have options for support!

1. We are offering peer support services via phone and email. If you wish to be connected with a HAND peer support volunteer, please complete a peer support request form.
2. All chapters are currently offering virtual support group meetings on regularly scheduled meeting days and times. For more information, please email meetings@handsupport.org.

We hope to resume our usual meeting schedule as soon as possible. Please check this website for updates. To discuss support options and for updates on support group meetings, please email meetings@handsupport.org and a HAND facilitator will contact you.

For Friends & Family

HAND BROCHURE

Download HAND’s Brochure to view the Services and Support we provide.

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How Friends & Family Can Help
As a friend or relative of parents who have lost a baby before, during, or after birth, you can provide vital support. We offer these simple suggestions to help you give aid and comfort.

  • Allow parents to share their pain.
  • Listen. Don’t try to fix or change parents’ feelings.
  • Express your own sorrow.
  • Say the baby’s name.
  • Be patient – grief may last for years.
  • Stay in touch often.

About Grief

  • Grieving over the loss of a baby, before or after birth, can be as intense as grief over the death of any other family member.
  • All parents must feel free to express their love for the baby they have lost and to grieve in their own way.
  • Seeing pregnant women and babies is often painful after the loss of a baby.
  • Fathers need opportunities to express their grief in their own way.
  • Family members and friends often find it hard to talk about the baby, and inappropriate remarks may cause further grief.
  • Parents often need help in talking with their other children about the baby’s death.
  • Grandparents often grieve for their grandchild, and may find it difficult to deal with their own child’s pain.
  • Anniversaries of the baby’s birth and death can bring back parents’ feelings of grief and loss.
  • Parents who are anxious about a subsequent pregnancy may need extra emotional support.

Resources